Caneworker descendants dream of island homes

Island Homes

Sonny MAster from sarahscragg on Vimeo.

Most people are familiar with the pitch of Australian politicians when speaking about immigration. It was post-war mass migration from Europe that provided the labour for the great monuments to nation-building such as the Snowy Mountain Scheme.

But far fewer remember that before Australia ever called itself by that name, agricultural workers from Melanesia were forging a nation in the canefields of Queensland - a nation that would later reject them once they had outlived their usefulness.

The descendants of those caneworkers are now remembering their contribution through two exhibitions in the Queensland town of Cooroy.

Most people are familiar with the pitch of Australian politicians when speaking about immigration. It was post-war mass migration from Europe that provided the labour for the great monuments to nation-building such as the Snowy Mountain Scheme.
 
But far fewer remember that before Australia ever called itself by that name, agricultural workers from Melanesia were forging a nation in the canefields of Queensland - a nation that would later reject them once they had outlived their usefulness.
 
The descendants of those caneworkers are now remembering their contribution through two exhibitions in the Queensland town of Cooroy.

Hear Podcast...

My Island Homes - curated by Imelda Miller (Queensland Museum) & Olivia Robinson (Sunshine Coast Regional Council) and Long a...long sugar...ca...cane - curated by Krishna Nahow-Ryall exhibit at the Cooroy Butter Factory (07 5454 9050) until 2nd July

 

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